A Kick in the Arse

It is so easy to get stuck in a rut, isn’t it? We live our daily lives and one day passes, then another, and they march on in a seemingly infinite line without much change from day to day. But sometimes, just the littlest change can make a huge improvement in our outlook and mental well-being.

I don’t want to be a Pollyanna. I don’t want to play the Glad Game or always look on the bright side. I usually wish to shoot people like that. But let me tell you about the change we made at our house last week and the difference it has made for me.

We bought a new couch. I know you’re thinking, “Whoop-de-doo.” But no, really, it has lifted me out of my rut. Let me back up a bit and explain.

When we first moved in together ten years ago, Kosta and I bought a couch. It was from a cheapy furniture store and the couch stayed intact for about a year before the frame started breaking down. My Dad, bless him, tried to shore it up and found the damn thing had been put together not with wood screws but with staples. But we didn’t have the money to drop on a new, well-made couch, so we just sucked it up and lived with it. Broken. For ten years. We both said we would much rather have a trip to Europe than a new couch.

The couch slowly sagged into its spot. We stuck pillows under the cushions to bolster us but it became cranky and carnivorous. It would eat you ass first if you sat on it. It was an awful situation that was really at the center of our home lives. We sat on it every day and it made us sad and frustrated.

Last weekend I’d had enough. I told Kosta we were going couch shopping. We aren’t going on a big trip this year and living with this half-sofa was killing us. So we decided on a budget and went to the consignment shops. Naples has a lot of them and they are filled usually with pretty decent furniture.

We walked around downtown and popped into stores. There were some that were nice but too expensive, some that were the right price but not what we wanted. There were a couple that were okay, but I wasn’t going to plop down money for something that was just okay. Consignment shops turn over pretty fast, especially this time of year when the snowbirds all go back north for the summer. I knew if we waited the right couch for us would come along.

It was getting late and we had one store left. We walked inside and boom, there it was, just waiting for us. It was blue like the Aegean, it looked brand new, and it was within our budget. I was instantly smitten and Kosta seemed pleased with it too. Up to this point all the couches had been in neutral colors – beige, and white (who gets a white sofa, I ask you???) and an occasional gold. But this sofa sat like a glittering sapphire in a field of blah.

And then we found out they were having a sale and that everything in the store that day was half off. I had to sit down. Fortunately the sofa was extremely comfortable too. We didn’t have to think very hard about it.

True, we had to pay to have it moved (it’s a sofa bed and extremely heavy), but that was nominal, and when you get a sofa for HALF PRICE it doesn’t hurt so much. We bought it Saturday, hauled the tired old sofa to the curb Sunday night, and had the new one in place Monday afternoon.

It all worked so easily that I am still stunned by it. And grateful. Because that new sofa has transformed our living room. It has transformed us. We aren’t embarrassed by its presence. We can have people over again and sit on it without being consumed.  We love admiring it, sitting on it, and feeling happy that it is there.

And now that we have that in place we want to do more. We are looking for an area rug next. I am going to mosaic some lamps. A fire has been kindled by something so simple as a new piece of furniture. And if I had kept thinking, “We can’t afford a new sofa” this never would have happened.

Sometimes you have to give yourself a kick in the arse. It’s amazing where you can land.

C.J. Redwine: Five Questions

Once upon a time there was a beautiful princess who lived in a faraway castle…

Scratch that.

Okay, once there was a princess named Ari didn’t really want to be a princess if she couldn’t snort, eat what she liked, or be friends with Cleo, the daughter of the head of the kitchens.

Ari’s twin brother Thad was king of Súndraille. He didn’t want to be king if he couldn’t keep his sister safe. So he made a deal with a dark and dangerous fae named Teague who could make it all better, but at the cost of his soul in ten years’ time.

Sebastian was a poverty-stricken young man with a mysterious past who became the new king’s weapons master. He didn’t want to be near people at all but was just making coin until he had enough to buy a cottage by the sea far, far away.

These three young people must work together to find a solution to their problem: saving Thad’s soul and the entirety of Súndraille from obliteration and repression by the evil Teague.

This book was an absolute joy to read. It had all the classic markings of a good fairy tale–a dark and twisted premise, a wicked villain, and a heroine with a heart of gold. But in addition to that C.J. Redwine wove in cheeky humor, palpable sorrow, and some rather gruesome action. It all melded together into a delicious read that kept me turning pages. It moved like a comet and kept me guessing until the very end.

1. What was the original seed idea for your book? Did it start with a character, a situation, or an idea?

THE WISH GRANTER started with the idea of writing a story about a Faustian Rumpelstiltskin, and then everything else built from there.

2. What is your writing process? Are you an outliner or a pantser?

I do a lot of world building and character development in my head (sometimes for years) before finally sitting down to write a very detailed synopsis, which mostly deals with backstory, world, and the major plot points. I discover the minor plot points as I write.

3. Who are the writers which most influence your writing style?

I love stories with vivid worlds, high stakes plots, and emotionally driven characters, so I’ve taken bits and pieces of inspiration from other writers who have some of those elements in their stories. Some examples would be Katie McGarry, C.S. Lewis, Terry Brooks, Rae Carson, Courtney Stevens, and J.K. Rowling.

4. Do you listen to music when you write?

I do! I build specific playlists for each book I write. My playlists are public on Spotify.

5. What are you reading right now?

I’m reading WINK POPPY MIDNIGHT by April Genevieve Tucholke


This is Redwine’s second book in the Ravenspire series. The first, The Shadow Queen, is a clever retelling of Snow White, and not to be missed.

C.J. Redwine is the New York Times bestselling author of YA fantasy novels, including The Shadow Queen, The Wish Granter, and the Defiance trilogy. If the novel writing gig ever falls through, she’ll join the Avengers and wear a cape to work every day. To learn more about C.J., visit her website at www.cjredwine.com.


I Am a Dreamer

In a recent conversation, I was told that I am a dreamer. The context of the conversation put a negative spin on that statement. The unsaid words that would have followed might have been, “no one takes a dreamer seriously,” or “being practical is much better.” In other words, dreamers just get in the way of getting shit done.

And it stung, let me tell you. I have been ruminating on this for a couple of weeks now and I admit I let it get to me. I don’t like being seen as unreliable, or impractical. I believe I am neither of those things.

But I mentioned this to several people and got a very different reaction. My friend Tammy said, “I see that as a compliment!” My husband metaphorically kicked my ass over it. He said, “Do you want to be a person with no imagination?”

And I realized they were right.

I want to be known as someone who creates, someone who dreams up amazing ideas, someone who writes marvelous stories. We need dreamers in this world. Without them we are all just sliding around in the mud.

So I am going to accept, “you are a dreamer,” as a form of praise, regardless of the context in which it was given. I am going to wear it as a badge and never again see it as a disadvantage. Dreamers do not get in the way of getting shit done. This dreamer has written three novels. This dreamer makes beautiful mosaics. This dreamer will always be looking for ways to bring more beauty to the world.

And if you can’t see that, then I guess you have no imagination.